Know Your Customer

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We help a limited number of ambitious and extraordinary clients to grow and scale their unique game-changing medical, dental, rehabilitation and wellness businesses

Will your business be our next success story?

Medical, dental, wellness and rehabilitation providers have been welcoming patients with passports and the means to pay for the services they need and want for centuries.

  1. Some come just for the services they need and have no interest in spending time in leisure activities at their selected destinations
  2. Some come for the leisure activities and add a little medical, dental or wellness activity to their agenda
  3. Some come because the services they desire are not available within their home community due to legal restrictions, provider scarcity, or subject to long delays
  4. Some come because they want privacy and anonymity
  5. Some seek a level of impeccable service that is only available at their chosen destination
  6. Some seek to consult with and obtain the opinion from a renowned celebrity specialist that is only available at one particular destination
  7. Some desire to participate in a clinical research trial that is available at one specific destination and is not available through remote monitoring and telehealth
  8. Some select a destination and providers from a short list of approved practitioners and health facilities that their employer or labor union has agreed to impanel and pay for services for covered conditions in accordance with its managed care benefits program, and lastly
  9. Some come because the cost of services they seek is more affordable at a location other than where they normally reside or travel for work.

For referral agencies, suppliers, investors, and governments interested in entering the exciting realm of health and wellness tourism, the first rule above all others is to KNOW YOUR CUSTOMER. Each brings to health and wellness tourism their treatment and travel objectives, expectations, a budget allowance, lifestyle preferences, suspicions and concerns, a desire to trust.

What to do with this information

For the health and wellness tourism industry, the sky is the limit on innovations, creativity and market penetration. But if you don’t know your customer well enough, targeting, messaging, and marketing will be a challenge to drive results.  To begin, create a spreadsheet with the nine reasons listed above in the first column. For your medical, dental and rehabilitation travel patients, can you estimate the percentage of patients in each of the none reason categories? If you can’t make these estimates, you aren’t ready to spend money on marketing, advertising, trade show stands or any other advertising and promotional efforts because you have no idea to whom you are speaking or what motivates them to buy from you.  So begin by creating your spreadsheet and list the 9 reasons in Column “A”.  In Column “B”, place your best “guesstimates” of percentages for each as you review the patients who already chose you as their provider.  Going forward, devise a way to learn this from each new patient as part of the subjective complaint in your S-O-A-P documentation. If you use an electronic medical record, you can create a template that will be a regular part of your subjective interview so that all you need to do is tic a box as you capture this information going forward. Make sure that you enable multiple choices because often health travel patients travel for more than one reason.

Emotional Drivers for every Health & Wellness Traveler

Each person and their travel companion brings to health and wellness travel, a deeply personal level of fear about:

  • losing control over their health and aging process
  • escalation of medical problems from acute to chronic
  • vulnerability in unfamiliar surroundings
  • confusion about how the destination experience will play out
  • concerns about what the follow up will be like on their return home

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Fear is a strong emotion. It s also a choice. The level of fear that each medical travel patient holds is amplified by uncertainty. It is a byproduct of the thoughts they create, the experiences they’ve had, and the experiences and prejudices that others have shared with them. Fear distracts, dissuades, and diminishes the likelihood that they will buy medical, dental, or rehabilitation services from a stranger.

Health & Wellness Tourism Product Design Strategy

As a seller of medical tourism, your first concern is to examine your approach to product design strategy.  You may believe that you sell surgical services, diagnostic services, therapeutic services, clinical research services and new and innovative treatments or medications. But that’s not your product, that’s your service.  No one wants to hear about somebody’s visit to the doctor or the gory details of their surgery or diagnostic procedure.

Answer these Basic Questions

  • Do you know what your product is?
  • If every product has a customer, who is your customer?
  • Why would they buy services from you instead of someone local or closer than where you are located?
  • What are their fears and how can you allay them?
  • What resonates trust and safety to them?
  • What kind of storytelling value, if any, will they want to tell when they return from their health or wellness travel experience? Is that what you provide?

How we can help you

If you need help to understand your medical, dental and rehabilitation tourism patients start with the examples and exercises above. If you don’t have time to do the research for yourself, our researchers can do this for you. If you have never treated medical, dental or rehabilitation patients in the past, there won’t be any data to measure. In that case, we’ll apply our experience in the industry to analyze what you do and how you do it for your local patients to create a product and marketing strategy for you. As a part of the execution of your product and marketing strategy, we’ll put the measurement and key performance indicator elements into place so that you can measure on your own going forward.

When you’re ready to begin, please schedule a complimentary chat with us.



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Services-at-a-Glance

  • Tailored mentorship and coaching
  • Corporate partner connections
  • Professional skills training
  • Masterclasses
  • Referral influencer connections
  • Insurance and employer connections
  • Marketing and branding strategies
  • Discounts on business services
  • Fam tour coordination and industry events
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Medical Tourism Destination Development

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We help a limited number of ambitious and extraordinary clients to grow and scale their unique game-changing medical, dental, rehabilitation and wellness businesses

Will your business be our next success story?

By Maria K Todd, MHA PhD

CEO & Founder,
The Mercury Healthcare International group of companies

You may automatically assume that I am going to write about sending medical tourism visitors from one country to another less expensive country and steering them to the publicly funded hospitals and clinics. Let me clear that up for you from the start: That’s not what this article is about.

A little background.

  • Years ago, in Bangkok, I was at a meeting of the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Finance. I was admonished directly with a stern “over the rim of the spectacles” look as I was “ordered” not to “cause brain drain” and incentivize Thai public health physicians “to cross the River of no return” to make money in the private health system for medical tourism.
  • A few years back in Turkey, I was taken to a teaching hospital in the greater Istanbul region where a public hospital associated with a medical school was shown to us as an alternative to the more pricey private hospitals in Istanbul to compete for medical tourism visitors.
  • In England, we’ve been hearing of foreign patients accessing the NHS public health trust hospitals and clinics at no cost by simply walking in and stating that they have a medical complaint and presenting for medical attention. The same could happen in Greece, because there really isn’t a well-developed revenue management system to produce and submit invoices for a system paid for on Ministry of Finance allocation funding.
  • Lately, I’ve been hearing of new hospital projects in the Caribbean where there is great need for local access to care, but the Chinese-investors bring the concrete and bulldozers, but don’t address management team and capacity development requirements as part of the package. Hence, brand new, beautiful, well-equipped hospitals lay dormant on islands all throughout the region. They raced all the way to the medical tourism strategy finish line without giving adequate consideration to the management of such a program – or any other program for that matter. Now they are “all dressed up for the dance” without having arranged for a dance partner or a band. That makes dancing solo in a ball gown with no music in the grand ballroom look rather silly – don’t you agree?

When I am in country on these medical tourism economic and destination development projects, I usually meet with several Ministries: Economic Development, Public Health, Tourism, Foreign Affairs, ICT, Urban & Regional Planning and Education. The reasons for this meeting are very specific and related to the strategies I develop for cross-ministerial goal setting, medical tourism public policy, benchmarking, process, standards for quality, safety and security, sustainable program funding, and jobs creation.

Capacity development for health and wellness tourism is not the same path as “pure” hospital management or hospitality administration. Equally important is the capacity development for the ministerial authorities who are politicians and concerned about public image and the risk of “appearing less informed than necessary” as they establish rules, procedures, conditions, public policies, standards, and budget allocations and financing. It is needed, but rarely addressed in medical tourism discussions – largely because the medical tourism programs across the world – except in a very few countries – progresses unchecked, unplanned and like the American westward expansion

In many countries where I’ve been invited to consult on medical tourism economic development, I’ve learned that there is no healthcare business administration university program to speak of. So, being one of very few individuals in the world with over 35 years in health tourism and professional hands-on experience in the healthcare administration, hospitality management, and travel planning worlds, I am often asked to develop a proposed framework curriculum for such a hybrid program.

It really isn’t an expensive project but it takes a working knowledge of the issues that many consultants in medical tourism simply don’t have. Yes, of course the others could patch one together at great expense because of the head count of different consultants. But I prefer to keep things simple: a flat fee consulting deliverable, completed in about 30 hours, without travel, and with all the planning and interviewing occurring via online meeting. I even write the TORs for them if they need me to do so. (I fear that if I elaborate further, that I’ll soon find my outline as the core of some new medical tourism certification being sold by some opportunist — ” for the low price of only $2500 as an add on offer at some future medical tourism conference”. If you want to know more, call or email me for additional information.)

When medical tourism comes to a destination, it requires extra skills in healthcare management. When these skills are able to be developed locally, the training and quality of management has the potential to be raised and community benefit enhanced.

As the saying goes, “a rising tide raises all boats”. Therefore, a proper healthcare business administration program (or even a certificate program through a university, college or vocational-technical school) or a hybrid health tourism administration degree or certificate program can benefit both the private medical tourism destination hospitals and the public health facilities that often run on heroics and very little cash and staffing. But it cannot happen without cash. So, to prevent the “over the rim of the spectacles” glare from the Ministers of Finance and Education, I come prepared with the proposed legislative draft for the tax increment financing approach.

Our approach involves the creation of a bill that authorizes a local government to charge a fee on certain medical providers for the purposes of creating a funding mechanism. One of our consultants who has extensive background in healthcare policy and finance in the USA set this up for a number of government hospitals. Rather than set the program up at a statewide level, he refined the proposed program to be administered at the local or regional level.

His approach provides flexibility to deal with cases in which there may be several eligible clinics, rehab centers, dialysis clinics, or private hospitals within a local jurisdiction and the tax can be assessed on receipts from medical tourism visitors. Local governments will have greater flexibility to construct the fee assessment in such a way that all agencies or hospitals benefit – like through capacity development, PPP operation or something else that the community needs relevant to its healthcare services delivery.

 

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Let’s face facts: If a medical tourism visitor has selected a preferred destination, a modest, transparent, medical tourism fee assessment isn’t going to be a deterrent. But if the destination receives 50,000 medical tourism visitors to its private hospitals, clinics and hotels each year, even a $25 fee generates over a million dollars per year to be used for special projects, education and other medical tourism destination enhancements that can benefit local citizens without requiring additional funding contributions from the National Finance budget.

If the public health systems begin receiving medical tourism visitors, such a program could also offset the problem of unreimbursed costs of the public health systems like the NHS trusts or the Εθνικό Σύστημα Υγείας (ESY) in Greece. It can also provide financial support for emergency medical services and ambulance expenditures, new equipment and technology, or to pay outstanding salaries and other expenses that have been in arrears in some jurisdictions.

In one program that our consultant developed in the USA, the local government would obtain a federal health funding match For example, the local government would assess a fee on the provider of 50 cents. The state obtained a federal match of 50 cents, the program would be funded a dollar for earmarked public education and other sustainable programs. Naturally, there’s more detail but each program takes a little creativity to craft the exact process, so it isn’t appropriate to elaborate further here. More than anything else for this approach to work in medical, dental, rehab or dialysis tourism, the destination needs critical mass of visitors, and it must be tied to actual medical tourism visitors, not just expatriates with foreign passports.

Of all the corporate medical tourism clients we have at Mercury Health Travel, I don’t foresee any objection by any self-insured employer saving at least $15,000 per case begrudging a sustainable public health support assessment of $50 per case, or less. I don’t foresee a private self-pay medical tourism visitor objecting to a fee in that range either. But the money and local community benefit adds up — if the volume is there.

Reasons to support approach

  1. The bill has the potential to bring a substantial increase in public health or education revenue to non-government owned or operated hospitals and home health care agencies at no or little cost to the state or local government entities.
  2. The bill does not compel any local government to set up the refinancing mechanism, it provides enabling language for communities for whom such a mechanism would benefit community health centers and public hospitals for the community’s residents.
  3. The bill provides flexibility to local governments to set up the fee structure so that all public health and education providers would end up with a net gain in revenue. Specifically, the bill allows various cost and revenue categories to be exempted from the calculation of the fee and would give local governments the option to determine how the fee would be calculated.
  4. The assessment proposal may or may not have to be voted on in an election since it does not tax the local residents.

Potential opposition:

  1. In some jurisdictions, there may be more than one public hospital or education institution. The funding approach is most lucrative with a significant volume of medical tourism visitors. In jurisdictions just getting started or largely disorganized and unsupported by government ministries, there may not be enough money generated to make the assessment worthwhile.
  2. There’s a start up cost and the money for local administrative costs has to come from some seed funding by the government. However, there is the possibility that the government could fund it as an advance against future revenues and pay itself back for the administrative expenses. However, it is unlikely that the provisions of the bill would result in substantial costs for local governments – even better if it is centralized across several medical tourism jurisdictions.

About the Author

Dr. Maria Todd is a leading international authority in medical tourism marketing strategy and tactics. For more than 35 years, she has been educating and advocating for the success of her clients as they launch and grow their medical tourism businesses. She does this through private coaching and consulting engagements, authoring numerous commercially published books on the business of medical tourism, and sharing articles and insights as a leading authority on the business of medical tourism. She generously underwrites open access to the Center for Health Tourism Strategy without cost or obligation as a free educational resource for the benefit of the medical tourism industry.

Bring your toughest marketing and business growth challenges to her. Learn more about what she does here on our website and begin the conversation with a complimentary 15-minute chat by phone or by Skype. If you are ready to begin working with a consultant, use that courtesy appointment to explain your situation and your goals and objectives to her. From there, she’ll tell you if she can help you and what you should do next to turn your dreams for your business into reality.



Request An Appointment To Chat With Us Today


Services-at-a-Glance

  • Tailored mentorship and coaching
  • Corporate partner connections
  • Professional skills training
  • Masterclasses
  • Referral influencer connections
  • Insurance and employer connections
  • Marketing and branding strategies
  • Discounts on business services
  • Fam tour coordination and industry events
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Image Management for Health and Wellness Tourism at Upscale Hotels & Resorts

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We help a limited number of ambitious and extraordinary clients to grow and scale their unique game-changing medical, dental, rehabilitation and wellness businesses

Will your business be our next success story?

By Maria K Todd, MHA PhD

CEO & Founder,
The Mercury Healthcare International group of companies

In my health & wellness tourism destination site inspections around the world, I’ve inspected thousands of upscale modern hotels, resorts, spas, guest houses, serviced apartments, thermal springs and thalasso resorts, boutique hotels, business hotels, and historic hotels. These resorts have invested heavily to attract a certain demographic and maintain a certain look and feel at their properties.

Hoteliers in every destination explain that while they are interested in exploring health and wellness tourism, they are apprehensive about the risk creating the look and feel of a convalescent home in their lobby and public areas.

Medical Tourism and Hotel Certifications

In Spain, one stunningly gorgeous beach resort in Marbella lost its Ritz Carlton designation and a few other certifications it paid a lot of money to display because the certifiers felt that a health tourism clientele would detract from the superbrand designation. Rather than risk it, the superbrand certifiers simply gave Notice of Termination for Cause.

Big superbrand certifications and badges of approval are hard to earn and maintain and cost a lot of money to acquire. They cannot simply interchange an approval or certification by the Latest, Greatest, Best Exotic Medical Tourism Hotel and Resort Certification being sold this week in association with some medical tourism conference event. The market respects and expects certain things from the superbrand established rating systems and is totally unaware of the significance of the other.

When benchmarking hotels and resorts that want to enter Medical Tourism or Wellness Tourism, I prefer to use the standards of ESPA as a foundation, modified by best practices and examples I’ve cultivated over 30 years in the business of medical tourism. Nothing outlandish, mind you, but a thorough checklist and criteria set depending on the type of medical, dental, rehab or wellness traveler anticipated.

Health & Wellness Tourism Appropriateness Criteria

Not every hotel, spa, resort, B&B or guest house is appropriate for every medical tourism visitor. So the first thing I ask the hotelier is

  • What kinds of guests will you be expecting?
  • What procedures will they have with which doctors and at which facilities?

There is a specific reason for this: It’s clinically driven.

A patient with a post-surgical abdominal wound is very different from a patient with a joint replacement of the lower body. A joint replacement in the upper body is different from lower body. Neck and back procedures are different from hand surgery. Cosmetic surgery has a broad range of complexity and facial procedures are very bloody and attract stares from strangers for weeks after surgery but the patient is discharged from hospital same day or day after. If a hematoma develops – potentially even longer. Meanwhile, the patient looks as if they went 10 rounds with Rocky Balboa. Few hoteliers want to attract a disproportionate share of guests that look like that in their lobby and restaurants.

Likewise, a patient that just had dental work done and is now suffering from the fading of the anesthetic and now on oral pain medication tablets is likely to vomit… a lot. No other guests, no matter how compassionate, wants to see vomit, smell vomit or hear vomiting in the lobby, the lobby bathroom, or other public areas. Housekeeping managers tell me that there’s more cleanup from vomit than from wound seepage and a little blood on sheets.

All those cute little boutique toiletry amenities in the bathroom may be full of allergens and ingredients, that, but for the medical procedure the guest just had, were a non-issue and are now a potential risk to guest safety. Also, the laundry soap that is used to was bed linens may be a source of allergic reactions and sensitivities.

Some hotels use “scratchy” sheets of a lower thread count that are intended to get in the bed, go to sleep, get up and get out of the room. A medical tourism patient recuperating may spend many more hours in the bed at first, and be very uncomfortable after a few days. If that patient soils the more expensive high-thread count sheets to the point where they cannot be re-used, that eats profit margins and raises overhead expenses. How will that be accounted for and price adjusted?

Some rooms can source a rented hospital bed but those require electricity that is grounded, from wall plugs that are wired for that level of amperage. Some patients also need a plug for their other medical appliances (IV pump, CPAP, humidifiers, CPM machines, etc.) Where will they plug them in?

Many hotels only have BBC and CNN news in English. How boring and frustrating is that if one is planning a 3-week recuperative stay? Often, they cannot download their membership media (Netflix, Roku, etc.) to their tablets or Chromecast devices because they are geo-restricted. How will they entertain themselves in their rooms?

Some procedures, such as breast surgery, shoulder surgery, and even hand surgery may require the patient to sit upright to sleep for sometimes as long as two months. Will the hotel have a recliner to place in the room? Where? One that rocks back and forth and is unstable to brace to get in and out of using solely knees, hips, ankles, and abdominal muscles can be risky and cause additional injury or complications. At the very least, it can be shockingly painful.

 

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There are many other metrics and criteria that I use but the points above are just the tip of my criteria iceberg.

In summary, not every 5-star hotel is ready or eager to entertain medical travel patients. Some want it but their space layout, furnishings, and normal operations are too far from what’s necessary – for some patients. If the hotelier tells me that they accommodate patients with certain conditions after specific procedures, then I evaluate them on that limited criteria. If they tell me they don’t know who their clientele will be, my inclination is to let them sort out what kinds of procedures they expect to recuperate at their location or I am duty bound to consider the entire range of possibilities.

Interviews

When I survey a hotel, I interview the reservations team, front desk staff and manager, security chief, housekeeping manager, maintenance chief, executive chef, night manager, a few of the waitstaff in the restaurant, spa manager, and a few shuttle drivers.

Typical oversights

What I encounter most often is that the hotel is chosen by the doctors or hospital to partner up because of the following inappropriate and insufficient criteria:

  1. Originally partnered to host well, able-bodied companions; not patients recuperating
  2. Designed as a headquarters base rather than a place to convalesce.
  3. Owned by the same corporate conglomerate that owns the hospital.
  4. Owned by the doctor’s relatives or friends.
  5. Price and proximity are valued over appropriateness and safety
  6. Hotels in a great location, great price, excellent service and wrong design (like Westin Grande Sukhumvit (BKK)), where lobby is on the 7th floor and guest rooms higher. How does one manage emergency egress by aerial ladder fire truck that only go as high as 3rd floor in the event of an evacuation?
  7. Hotels with carpet everywhere posing a trip hazard and wheelchair challenges.
  8. Hotels with multi-level design elements, with stairs, ramps and doors that swing the wrong way for a person with a mobility challenge.
  9. Noisy locations. Sounds are often “amplified” when processed by the auditory nerves while on pain and other medications.
  10. Hotels with lots of plant and organic matter all around the hotel that is contraindicated for cancer patients, transplant patients, orthopedic patients, and others with both known and unknown allergies.
  11. Staircases without handrails.
  12. Bathrooms without emergency call alarms or telephones.
  13. High bathtubs and no showers. No shower seat available.
  14. Low toilets and no handrails.
  15. Low profile beds and mattresses in poor condition
  16. Inadequate wall power receptacles
  17. Elevators that cannot manage a normal size wheelchair.
  18. Temperature controls not accessible or controlled by the guest.
  19. Poor lighting for reading, poor entertainment options.

Obviously, there are many more criteria and evaluation metrics to consider. If you are a hotelier considering a medical tourism collaboration with local health facilities, doctors, dentists, and therapists, contact me with any questions or to come to your location to conduct a site evaluation and readiness assessment.

I can tell you which patients you’ll be ready to manage with little to no change, and which may pose more of a challenge. My consulting assignments typically include an initial meeting, site visit and gap analysis, a report of findings and proposed improvements aligned to your medical tourism business strategy and objectives. I am well versed in hotel ops, as well as thalasso and balneo, spa, thermal waters resorts and am an Academician with the Ukrainian Academy of Rehab and Human Health and on the Scientific Committee of Termatalia in Spain. I am deeply familiar with the certification standards of ESPA and other popular accreditation systems and properties of evidence-based design principles for hotels and hospitals. I’ve been involved in the business of medical tourism in some way since 1978. I’ve also done several hundred mystery shops for one of the world’s leading mystery shopping firms and an international tourism and travel association.

About the Author

Dr. Maria K Todd is the Executive Director, Center for Health Tourism Strategy and the Health and Wellness Tourism Team Leader at Mercury Healthcare International. She is the author of 5 books on medical tourism business development and operations, including, The Handbook of Medical Tourism Program Development. She leads the industry with over 35 years of education and advocacy in health and wellness tourism for the success of her clients.



Request An Appointment To Chat With Us Today


Services-at-a-Glance

  • Tailored mentorship and coaching
  • Corporate partner connections
  • Professional skills training
  • Masterclasses
  • Referral influencer connections
  • Insurance and employer connections
  • Marketing and branding strategies
  • Discounts on business services
  • Fam tour coordination and industry events
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Free Checklist: Health & Wellness Tourism Readiness For Hotels, Spas, B&Bs and Resorts

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    Checklist for Medical Tourism Hotels

     

    Schedule a Complimentary Chat With Us About Your Business

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We help a limited number of ambitious and extraordinary clients to grow and scale their unique game-changing medical, dental, rehabilitation and wellness businesses

Will your business be our next success story?

By Maria K Todd, MHA PhD

CEO & Founder,
The Mercury Healthcare International group of companies

Chances are high that if you are in the hospitality industry, you’ve been reading about medical, dental, and wellness tourism in the media, at hotel and hospitality association meetings and events and local and regional economic development council forums

You may be located very close to a clinic, hospital or another type of healthcare facility to which patients and their companions travel to access healthcare from afar. These often guests require more than just a place to sleep and call headquarters while they are visiting your area, even though they may not require admission to the health facility overnight.

No matter how many stars or diamonds you’ve earned by the recognized hotel rating systems…

  • Is your hotel, spa, B&B or resort a candidate to accommodate their special needs?
  • Are you sure? What if you aren’t?
  • Are you ready to risk your excellent brand reputation and social media ratings?

And if you are, what strategy will you deploy and with whom to get the word out that you are ready and can prove it? What story will you tell? What message will you communicate?

Global Health Sources, a Mercury Healthcare International company established in 2003 brings you the training and model protocols, policies and procedures to help you and your staff to prepare to welcome health and wellness travelers and to work more closely with doctors, dentists, and tourism destination managers and referral partners. Then we introduce you to providers, destination coordinators and referral agencies that influence guest choices.

Our experts have been working hands with the medical tourism industry since 1978.

“Certificates, plaques and logos on a website don’t translate to more bookings or higher ADR. Show guests & referral influencers how much you care, how well-prepared you are to care for health and wellness guests and that your staff is ready and waiting to welcome and pamper them.”

 

About the Author

Photo of Dr Maria Todd, CEO of Mercury Healthcare International

Maria Todd began working in medical tourism in 1978. She worked with a leading national travel agency and automobile association as a hotel inspector for several years.

Her first medical tourism hotel project was in 1983, when she was the principal project manager to lead a family of local South Florida physician investors to purchase an abandoned, hurricane damaged 90-room beachfront hotel property. Together, they and transformed the property into a lavish, licensed and state-accredited, senior memory care center with 76 serviced apartments and a 14-suite cosmetic surgery respite and recovery spa resort for medical tourism patients. The property featured a common nursing station, a common dining area for memory care residents and private spa cuisine dining area for medical tourism guests.

At a time when there was no such thing as internet marketing, within 3 months of grand opening, occupancy was at a constant 92%. Over the ensuing two years, they completed two more acquisitions and transformations – all three successful in meeting and exceeding early term revenue projections.

If you want to grow your year-round hotel occupancy and penetrate the health and wellness tourism sector successfully, call her to talk about your situation and objectives. She’ll tell you if she can help and how. The initial call is without cost or obligation. Within 3 months you can be greeting and delighting long-stay medical, dental and wellness tourism guests and realizing tremendous boots in ADR.

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HERE’S A CHECKLIST YOU CAN USE TO SELF-ASSESS YOUR READINESS FOR HEALTH & WELLNESS TOURISM VISITORS

Anticipating Special Needs

  • Mobility challenges
  • Visual and auditory challenges
  • Lighting and power requirements
  • HVAC comfort controls
  • Protocols for when medical guests feel unwell while in public areas
  • Protocols for when medical guests feel unwell in their room

Special Needs FF&E

  • Deluxe hospital bed (rental or in storage)
  • Other rental medical equipment available
  • Reclining Chair available
  • Bolster pillows and cushions available
  • In-room refrigeration for medications and snacks
  • Loaner wheelchair, crutches, canes available
  • Shower chairs, shoe horns, etc. available
  • Special needs room layout considerations

Allergies and sensitivities

  • Laundry and linens
  • Vanity Amenities
  • Food and beverage considerations and protocols
  • Plants, organic matter, dust and pest control protocols
  • Lighting and noise considerations
  • Air exchange considerations

Risk management

  • Fall and trip hazards
  • Electrical shock hazards
  • Water hazards
  • Window and balcony hazards
  • Security / Vulnerability / CCTV
  • Shelter-in-Place considerations
  • Emergency egress / Alternative egress
  • Bloodborne and other pathogens handling by staff

Amenities

  • Internet access & reliability
  • In-room entertainment
  • Special foods & beverages
  • Turndown service considerations
  • Bathroom amenities
  • Laundry services
  • Transfers to and from clinic

Health & Wellness Tourism Preparation For Hotels, Spas, B&Bs and Resorts

If you decide there’s more to this than you originally thought, we’ll conduct an on-site assessments, gap analysis, propose any training and remediation you may need to fill deficiencies, and then prepare a marketing strategy and all the marketing communications materials you’ll need and introduce you to referral influencers (e.g., doctors, dentists, hospitals, clinics, tour operators, travel agencies, destination coordinators and medical tourism referral agents.)

You’ll be delighting long-stay medical tourism guests and boosting ADR in less than 3 months.

 

 

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Services-at-a-Glance

  • Tailored mentorship and coaching
  • Corporate partner connections
  • Professional skills training
  • Masterclasses
  • Referral influencer connections
  • Insurance and employer connections
  • Marketing and branding strategies
  • Discounts on business services
  • Fam tour coordination and industry events
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